Cokkie Hemminga

Cokkie Hemminga

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Cokkie Hemminga
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Japanese Food Greeting Cards by furrylittlepeach. You make miso happy

Top Quotes about Love : Japanese Food Greeting Cards by furrylittlepeach. You make miso happy

Katsuura beach, Fukuoka, Japan

Perfect backdrop i reckon

A guide to Naoshima and Teshima – the Japanese art islands.

Naoshima & Teshima: a guide to the Japanese art islands

Jizo

Jizo statue in Koyto, Japan. S)Click the link now to find the center in you with our amazing selections of items ranging from yoga apparel to meditation space decor!

temple of the fox -- Japan

Temple of the Fox, Kyoto-shi.

Kyoto, Japan

Temple Detail with Lanterns Kyoto Japan. Photography by Tiko Taco

Mossy Jizo statues at Otagi Nenbutsu-ji temple, Kyoto, Japan

Garden heads Mossy Jizo statues at Otagi Nenbutsu-ji temple, Kyoto, Japan

Dōsojin (on the left) Dōsojin (Dosojin). Pre-Buddhist Japanese folk deities who administer the border between this world and hell; later incorporated into Japanese Buddhist mythology. The Dōsojin protect mountain passes, crossroads, and village boundaries, obstructing the passage of evil entities and demons of disease. Jizō is the Buddhist counterpart (honjibutsu 本地仏) of the Dōsojin

Dōsojin (on the left) Dōsojin (Dosojin). Pre-Buddhist Japanese folk deities who administer the border between this world and hell; later incorporated into Japanese Buddhist mythology. The Dōsojin protect mountain passes, crossroads, and village boundaries, obstructing the passage of evil entities and demons of disease. Jizō is the Buddhist counterpart (honjibutsu 本地仏) of the Dōsojin

Stone statue(guardian deity of children)

Stone statue(guardian deity of children)

Dosojin is the Japanese Shinto deity charged with protecting the border between this world and hell. Stones such as these were talismans protecting against disease, curses, & ensuring safe journeys.

Stone Double-Jizo Bosatsu Dosojin Buddha Edo 18 c.