Pinterest • De ideeëncatalogus voor iedereen

Post mortem vintage photo. Saddest postmortem I have ever seen! The Keller Family: Emil, Mary, and 9-month old Anna Keller. Mary shot Emil through the heart, mortally wounded Anna, and then committed suicide. Gelatin silver print. Auburn, New York, January 25, 1894.

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Eye of a lady c.1905 Watercolour on ivory; set in a diamond-mounted stickpin Dia. (miniature): 1.1 cm First recorded in the Royal Collection during the reign of King Edward VIII

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Georgian Era (1741-1811) Weeping Lover’s Eye Mourning Jewelry

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In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, miniature eye portraits were all the rage. This was after the late 17th century rage for miniature portraits of any kind. They were painted most often using watercolor or gouache, on a substrate of ivory or parchment, then set into a bit of jewelry- a pin or pendant. In Victorian times the eye portrait was often a piece of mourning jewelry, but the origin of this form was as a token of love.

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"Stanislovski Tears" Brooch by Kim Eric Lilot Sterling silver, glass eye, fresh-water pearl, eye-lashes

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pathofneedles: misswallflower: Mourning jewellery  Wow, so lovely!

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1870 Mourning brooch Set with jet and pearls, this is an exceptionally pretty pin. The hair is arranged as a feather through a wreath and with leaves. It's all hair. The back is inscribed M. B. Barrett 1819 - 1869. Pearls and jet both had great symbolism for the Victorians. The pearls signified tears.

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van V and A Collections

Locket

Locket Place of origin: England, Britain (made) Date: 1775-1800 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Gold with a composition in hair, metal and seed pearls on opaline glass, watercolour Museum number: 956-1888 Gallery location: Jewellery, room 91 mezzanine, case 81, shelf D3, box 4

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