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The "Black Eye" galaxy, so named because an ancient cosmic smashup produced a dark ring and a roiling, conflicted interior.  (Reuters / NASA)

The "Black Eye" galaxy, so named because an ancient cosmic smashup produced a dark ring and a roiling, conflicted interior. (Reuters / NASA)

spiral galaxy

spiral galaxy

In August of 2007, astronomers located a gigantic hole in the universe. This empty space, stretching nearly a billion light-years across, is devoid of any matter such as galaxies, stars, and gas, and neither does it contain the strange and mysterious dark matter, which can be detected but not seen. The large void in the Constellation Eridanus appears to be improbable given current cosmological models. A radical and controversial theory proposes that it is a "universe-in-mass black hole."

In August of 2007, astronomers located a gigantic hole in the universe. This empty space, stretching nearly a billion light-years across, is devoid of any matter such as galaxies, stars, and gas, and neither does it contain the strange and mysterious dark matter, which can be detected but not seen. The large void in the Constellation Eridanus appears to be improbable given current cosmological models. A radical and controversial theory proposes that it is a "universe-in-mass black hole."

The Black Eyed Galaxy

The Black Eyed Galaxy

The Wizard Nebula ~ NGC 7380 is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. It is located in the constellation Cepheus about 7,000 light-years from Earth, within the Milky Way Galaxy. The star cluster is embedded in a nebula, which spans some 110 light-years. The stars of Wizard Nebula have emerged from this star-forming region in the last 5 million years or so, making it a relatively young cluster.

The Wizard Nebula ~ NGC 7380 is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. It is located in the constellation Cepheus about 7,000 light-years from Earth, within the Milky Way Galaxy. The star cluster is embedded in a nebula, which spans some 110 light-years. The stars of Wizard Nebula have emerged from this star-forming region in the last 5 million years or so, making it a relatively young cluster.

Via Hubble: The cosmic "ice sculptures" of the Carina Nebula. Scientists are still trying to explain the beautiful spires.

Via Hubble: The cosmic "ice sculptures" of the Carina Nebula. Scientists are still trying to explain the beautiful spires.

Quasar- this is a black hole that is the brightest object in the universe and is thousands of times brighter than the stars in a galaxy combined! Light is shot out of either end in extremely long distances. The light we see coming from these today is very old meaning there are no quasars recently. They are all from far away but a new one can appear at any moment

Quasar- this is a black hole that is the brightest object in the universe and is thousands of times brighter than the stars in a galaxy combined! Light is shot out of either end in extremely long distances. The light we see coming from these today is very old meaning there are no quasars recently. They are all from far away but a new one can appear at any moment

Around a black hole 12 billion light years away, there's an almost unimaginable vapor cloud of water--enough to supply an entire planet's worth of water for every person on earth, 20,000 times over.

Around a black hole 12 billion light years away, there's an almost unimaginable vapor cloud of water--enough to supply an entire planet's worth of water for every person on earth, 20,000 times over.

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

Nearly a million seconds of observing time with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spiral galaxy similar to the Milky Way glittering with hundreds of X-ray points of light.

Nearly a million seconds of observing time with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spiral galaxy similar to the Milky Way glittering with hundreds of X-ray points of light.