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Embroidery

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Leaves Embroidery Tutorial By Shab's Corner

Hello friends!Welcome to Shab Embroideryish .. I upload hand embroidery tutorials here. You will learn about amazing embroidery stitches and you will find my...

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Embroidery Pattern | Embroidery Kit | DYI Celestial

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Hand Embroidery Stitches 101

I encourage you to use additional resources if you need more instruction than this simple guide. I have found video to be very useful in understanding stitches. Please click on the links below to watch very quick clips of the stitches. You can also find a directory of longer videos here, with more detailed instruction. Please stay tuned as I add more stitches to this index and fill out each section with more details and video. Stitches are listed alphabetically. ------------------------------------ Back stitch Back stitch is worked from right to left and is great for creating solid lines. It helps to shorten the stitch length when using this stitch (and other linear stitches) to outline curved lines. You can also use this stitch to fill a shape and your stitches will look like little bricks. It’s also a great stitch for lettering. Start a stitch length away from the beginning of your line. Come up at A, then down at B, the start of your line. Then up a stitch length away at C, and back down at A. Up again at D and then down at C. Be sure to use the same same holes (A, C, etc) so there is no gap between your back stitches. VIDEO: Back stitch VIDEO: 2 ways to fill with back stitch Lettering tutorial Whipped back stitch To whip your back stitch come up at A, the beginning of your line. Then weave under and over EVERY stitch until you reach the end of the line. Bring your needle down at B and anchor. VIDEO: Whipped back stitch Lettering tutorial Blanket or Buttonhole stitch Buttonhole (also called blanket stitch) is a traditional edging stitch that creates a line with regular vertical stitches. Come up at A along your edge and back down at B, a point one stitch above the edge one stitch length away, and leave slack. Come up at C, a stitch length away from A along the edge and catch the loop from the first stitch. Continue, going down at D, a point above the edge one stitch length away leaving the slack to catch when coming up at point E. You can vary how long the vertical stitches are by how high above your edge you bring your needle down at points B and D. To fill a shape with buttonhole stitch start at the bottom edge of your shape. Your first stitch will come up and go down the same hole (A). Catch the loop of the first stitch at point B, up the edge of the shape. Go back down at C, a stitch length away from A, leaving a loop. Catch this loop at point D, a stitch length away from B along the edge of the shape. Continue moving up the shape, modifying the stitch length on either side to change the angle and density of stitches. VIDEO: Buttonhole Chain stitch Chain Stitch creates a lovely textured line and has many variations to play with. Come up and down with the needle at the start of your line (A), leaving a loop. Come back up within the loop (B), a stitch length away, and pull to tighten the loop to desired tautness. End the chain with a small stitch tacking the loop down. This is another nice linear stitch for lettering. VIDEO: Traditional, reverse and detached chain stitch Lettering tutorial Reverse chain stitch Reversed Chain Stitch starts at the “end” of chain stitch with the small tacking stitch (A-B). Come up through the fabric a stitch length away (C) and slip your needle under the tacking stitch (do not pierce the fabric) before coming back down through the same hole (C). Continue in a chain. VIDEO: Traditional, reverse and detached chain stitch Lettering tutorial Detached chain stitch Detached Chain Stitch AKA Lazy Daisy is great for leaves and flowers. You can experiment with tension here, giving a thin or more rounded leaf/petal shape. Here you create a series of single chains. VIDEO: Traditional, reverse and detached chain stitch Chained Feather stitch Begin as you would a detached chain stitch, coming up and going back down at A while leaving a loop. Catch that loop by coming up at B and go down at C, creating a long anchor stitch. Continue to create these long-tailed detached chain stitches, alternating the angle of the stitch and lining up the anchor stitches so they appear to all be interconnected through the chains. VIDEO: Chained feather Heavy chain stitch VIDEO: Heavy Chain Stitch Couching Couching is a great linear stitch I like to use for lettering and stems or vines. This stitch uses two working threads which can vary in size (ply), type and color. The couched thread is pulled up at the start of your line (a) and goes down all of the way at the end of your line (b), leaving slack. Your couching thread is then used to tack down the couched thread along the curves of the lines. Both threads are anchored once the desired line is created. VIDEO: Couching Lettering tutorial Feather stitch Begin as you would a fly stitch, coming up at A and down at B, leaving a loop. Catch that loop at C, which begins the arm of the next stitch. Go down at D, leaving a loop, and catch the loop coming up at E. Continue, finishing with a small anchor stitch as you would complete a fly stitch. VIDEO: Feather stitch VIDEO: Feather on a leaf Feather Twig stitch Feather twig stitch is very similar to feather stitch with an added “twig” down the center of each fly stitch, secured with a wrap similar to a French knot. Come up at A and down at B, leaving a loop. Catch that loop at C and go down at D, leaving a loop. Come back up at E, on the other side of the original stitch from C. Wrap the loop created from stitch C-D around your needle (one to two times) and go down at F, leaving a loop to catch at G to create the next stitch. Complete the stitch at the desired length with a small anchor stitch. Funky Feather Twig stitch Funky feather twig stitch is created by changing the angle of one arm and the twig stitch of every feather. This variation creates a more narrow design. Note that the backbone of stitches remains the same. VIDEO: Feather, Feather twig and Funky feather twig Fern stitch Fern Stitch makes a nice addition to any florals. I think of it as a series of Y's made of back stitches. VIDEO: Fern stitch Fishbone stitch Fishbone Stitch is my favorite way to fill leaves. You can use an angle more parallel or perpendicular to the vein of the leaf to give different looks. Go back and forth from the starting stitches at the top of the leaf and working down the sides of the outline. The stitches come up at the top and cross each other mid-leaf. VIDEO: Fishbone stitch Full fishbone stitch tutorial Fly stitch Fly stitch can be used for

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Lexa's Moment

sosuperawesome: “Embroidered Clothing / DIY Kits River Birch Threads on Etsy ” Omg if any of my housemates embroider (hint hint) and are wondering what to make for me for my birthday or something,...

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Ring lazy daisy stitch. Hydrangea embroidery pattern. Embroidery tutorial. Floral cross stitch.

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