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422 Global Dialogue
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National styles in graphic design have emerged since the 60s, developing unique stances because of the strong approaches of particular designers and studios. Due to developments in technology and the expansion of design education, their influence spread to other parts of the world, resulting in a global visual culture. During the 80s and 90s, advanced electronic and computer technology created a cultural climate that impacted the processes and appearance of graphic design. (Meggs 22)
A History of Graphic Design: Chapter 60: Posters in Social Protests

"Power to the People: POWER & EQUALITY," social protest for the rights of African-Americans in graphic design posters. Silk screen poster designed by Shepard Fairey. Bold colors, simple shapes, and the lines really draw the eyes inward.

Takenobu Igarashi (b.1944) poster for the Kanagawa Art Festival, 1984.  After graduating from Tama University in 1968, he earned a graduate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. Upon returning to Japan, he opened his own design office in 1970. Much of his studio’s work is in trademark, corporate identity, environmental, and product design.

"Designed by Takenobu Igarashi for the 1984 Kanagawa Art Festival, this poster is designed to show a universe as time and space continues its expansion." Quoted from link

JAPAN:  Ryuichi Yamashiro (b.1920), poster for tree planting exercise represented by only two kanji, 'forest' and 'grove'. 1954. The tree-planting poster by this Japanese designer demonstrates just how successfully national traditions can be maintained while incorporating international influences, as Eastern calligraphy and spatial concerns unite with a Western communications concept .

『●写植-SK-3RY(手動写真植字機)と一枚のポスター』

tenpadego: “ cocokashi-co: “ “ “ mffl-emm: “ gurafiku: “ Japanese Poster Design: The kanji forest.

Alan Fletcher (b. 1931), V&A logo design, 1990. Pentagram.

Victoria & Albert Museum - Alan Fletcher - Class and simplicity.

Photo http://ift.tt/2eST3jT #gdbot #durven

graphics thisisgrey likes : Photo

Bulgarian film posters from the 60’s and 70’s.

From "SOCMUS” Bulgarian graphic design from the socialist era

Franco Grignani

Franco Grignani - Alfieri & Lacroix, 1960 Ad for Alfieri & Lacroix typo-lithographers. Art by Studio Grignani, Milano, Italy

Another genius of Japanese poster design. Ikko Tanaka (1930-2002)  established his own studio in Tokyo in 1963, and is credited with developing Muji's identity, where he worked as art director until 2001. You wouldn't believe how much this guy has been ripped-off over the years by other "poster designers". This is the real deal; clean, effortless design created with a true illustrator's hand.

Ikko Tanaka - Man and Writing

Ikko Tanaka, poster for Nihon Buy, 1981.   Traditional Japanese motifs, including landscape, Kanze Noh theater, calligraphy, masks, and woodblock prints, are reinvented in a modernist design idiom.

Ikko Tanaka

Ikko TANAKA, Nihon Buyo, 1981 © Ikko TANAKA Offset, 103 x cm Client: UCLA Asian Performing Arts Institute (University of California, Los Angeles) Poster for a Japanese traditional dance performance at UCLA

Ikko Tanaka

Morisawa 「Man and Writing」 Ikko

Takenobu Igarashi (b.1944), poster for Expo '85, 1982. LINK to more about Igarashi's alphabets.

Takenobu Igarashi poster for Expo LINK to more about Igarashi's alphabets.

ENGLAND: Alan Fletcher, Colin Forbes, and Bob Gill, cover for Graphis, 1965. The record of a parcel's internetaional journey carrying Pentagram work to the magazine also became the package carrying Graphis to its readers. LINK to Pentagram's current website.

ENGLAND: Alan Fletcher, Colin Forbes, and Bob Gill, cover for Graphis, The record of a parcel's internetaional journey carrying Pentagram work to the magazine also became the package carrying Graphis to its readers. LINK to Pentagram's current website.

Colin Forbes (b.1928), symbol for the Zinc Development Assn. Die Casting Conference, 1966. Pentagram.

Colin Forbes symbol for the Zinc Development Assn.

Masuda Tadashi (1922), (designer) and Doki Mitsuo (photographer), cover for Brain magazine, 1964.  His growing involvement in the use of photographic illustration to solve graphic design problems, combined with his interest in collaborative and team design, culminated in the establishment of the Masuda Tadashi Design Institute in 1958. Through his collaborative team approach, unexpected solutions and new ways of seeing things emerged.

An imaginative approach to photographic design was developed by Masuda Tadashi. The use of photographic illustration to solve graphic design problems culminated in the establishment of the Masuda Tadashi Design Institute in

Takenobu Igarashi, F. Chopin, F. Liszt. 1981. By 1976, his experiments with alphabets drawn on isometric grids were attracting clients and international recognition. He calls his three-dimensional alphabetic sculptures architectural alphabets.

Takenobu Igarashi, F. Chopin, F. By his experiments with alphabets drawn on isometric grids were attracting clients and international recognition. He calls his three-dimensional alphabetic sculptures architectural alphabets.

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