More ideas from Mischa
Hammer Sign, same as our catholic cross gesture, saying father son Holy Spirit. Interesting. :)

Hammer Sign, God has worked the symbol of the cross into other cultures for centuries, I believe to prepare Christ's arrival and love to this world. I would replace the oath with the father, the son the holy spirt amen

The Tarim mummies were discovered in the Tarim Basin in present-day Xinjiang, China, and date from 1800 BCE to 200 CE. The earliest Tarim mummies, found at Qäwrighul and dated to 1800 BCE, are of a Europoid physical type whose closest affiliation is to the Bronze Age populations of southern Siberia, Kazakhstan, Central Asia, and the Lower Volga. Their textiles may indicate a common origin with Indo-European neolithic clothing techniques. Wiki text

Tocharian female is a Tarim mummy and lived around BC. She was tall, with a high nose and long flaxen blond hair, perfectly preserved in ponytails. The weave of her clothing appears similar to Celtic cloth. She was around 40 years-old when she died.

Herodotus testified that the Scythians wore tattoos as a sign of their nobility. A Scythian without tattoos showed that he was of low station. The fanciful Scythian depictions of wild animals had influenced the art of China, Persia, India, and Eastern Europe.

Herodotus testified that the Scythians wore tattoos as a sign of their nobility. A Scythian without tattoos showed that he was of low station. The fanciful Scythian depictions of wild animals had influenced the art of China, Persia, India, and Eastern Eur

"They represented the equality as they fought along side their men in battlefields. In the current central Asia one could only find the traces of such equality.The act of war was one in which the Scythian women are said to have participated in equally with the men. Scythian women were tattooed like their mates, and the ancient historian Diordorus commented that Scythian women ‘fight like the men and are nowise inferior to them in bravery’."

Scythian, but some of the elements could work.) "Scythian women were tattooed like their mates, and the ancient historian Diordorus commented that Scythian women ‘fight like the men and are nowise inferior to them in bravery’.