More ideas from Moerman
Blanket Octopus - who knew? When threatened, these cephalopods can unfurl a large flap to make themselves appear larger than they actually are. The females can grow up to 6 feet in length while the males are only a few centimeters long.

Blanket Octopus - When threatened, these cephalopods can unfurl a large flap to make themselves appear larger than they actually are. The females can grow up to 6 feet in length while the males are only a few centimeters long. Looks like a wizard!

There’s a whole world of sci-fi monsters right here on our very own planet.

This unbelievably cute and smiley little cephalopod is known as a Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi). Its skin patterns form the adorable shape of a small smiling face and its tentacles look like curly locks of hair on its head. The Piglet Squid.

modern monsters sightings | ... often mistaken for sea monsters when they are found dead every year

Unidentified creature found on beach. This strange unknown sea monster washed ashore on an unknown beach. What is this strange animal? This picture was sent .

The Oar-fish — also known as ribbon fish — are among the largest fish in the ocean, with some that can grow to up to 50 feet long. Because of its size, many believe sea serpent folklore and stories of mythological sea creatures originate with the oar-fish.  They commonly reside 3,000 feet deep, and sightings of this sea monster are extremely rare.

Oar Fish: This is an oarfish - one of a group of long bony fish found in tropical and temperate waters throughout the world. One species (Regalecus glesne) is capable of reaching in length.

Flaring the gills that give the species its name, a frilled shark swims at Japan's Awashima Marine Park on Sunday, January 21, 2007. Sightings of living frilled sharks are rare, because the fish generally remain thousands of feet beneath the water's surface.

Flaring the gills, gives the species its name, a Frilled Shark swims at Japan's Awashima Marine Park. Sightings of living frilled sharks are rare, because the fish generally remain thousands of feet beneath the ocean's surface.