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The babushka, or Russian granny, is a pervasive image in Western culture, and, good news – she exists! There are a lot of older women in Russia who look exactly like stereotypical “babushkas” – small and short with scarves around their heads.

The babushka, or Russian granny, is a pervasive image in Western culture, and, good news – she exists! There are a lot of older women in Russia who look exactly like stereotypical “babushkas” – small and short with scarves around their heads.

Sad, but true... if you get stopped by police for a random check in the Metro and don’t have your passport with you, or even if you’re stopped for a traffic violation, police will often offer you a choice between an official ticket or paying them off. And that’s just one example.

Sad, but true... if you get stopped by police for a random check in the Metro and don’t have your passport with you, or even if you’re stopped for a traffic violation, police will often offer you a choice between an official ticket or paying them off. And that’s just one example.

Gender roles are alive.In Russia Men are men and women are women, in every aspect of daily life. Men are expected to be very traditionally chivalrous, opening doors, pulling out chairs, and paying for the ladies. Women are expected to cook, clean and always look gorgeous

Gender roles are alive.In Russia Men are men and women are women, in every aspect of daily life. Men are expected to be very traditionally chivalrous, opening doors, pulling out chairs, and paying for the ladies. Women are expected to cook, clean and always look gorgeous

Almost all Russians are capable of drinking vodka like water, and most of them will always have a bottle in their house whether they drink it regularly or not. If you are ever at an event of any sort organized by Russian people, there will be vodka there, and it will be offered to you! Yep. True story. And of course, remember that just because Russians like vodka, it does not mean that they are alcoholics – they can just drink more than most other people!

Almost all Russians are capable of drinking vodka like water, and most of them will always have a bottle in their house whether they drink it regularly or not. If you are ever at an event of any sort organized by Russian people, there will be vodka there, and it will be offered to you! Yep. True story. And of course, remember that just because Russians like vodka, it does not mean that they are alcoholics – they can just drink more than most other people!

It is always winter in Russia. Always cold,  and freezing. Well. Off course this is not true. First of all it depends of what part of Russia we are talking about. But for instance, when I have been in Moscow in the summer, it was almost +35 degrees, so no worries :)

It is always winter in Russia. Always cold, and freezing. Well. Off course this is not true. First of all it depends of what part of Russia we are talking about. But for instance, when I have been in Moscow in the summer, it was almost +35 degrees, so no worries :)

'Maslenitsa' - Perhaps the most cheerful holiday in Russia is the Pancake week. The rituals of Maslenitsa are very unusual and interesting because they combine the end of the winter holiday rituals and the opening of new spring festivals and ceremonies, which were to promote a rich harvest. Maslenitsa is celebrated during the week preceding spring. Every day of Maslenitsa was devoted to special rituals.

'Maslenitsa' - Perhaps the most cheerful holiday in Russia is the Pancake week. The rituals of Maslenitsa are very unusual and interesting because they combine the end of the winter holiday rituals and the opening of new spring festivals and ceremonies, which were to promote a rich harvest. Maslenitsa is celebrated during the week preceding spring. Every day of Maslenitsa was devoted to special rituals.

Many Russians celebrate Victory Day on May 9. On this day, TV networks broadcast World War II-inspired films, younger generations honor veterans, and the festivities culminate in a military parade at Moscow’s Red Square. Most veterans wear their medals as they head to the parade or an event organized by a local veteran organization.

Many Russians celebrate Victory Day on May 9. On this day, TV networks broadcast World War II-inspired films, younger generations honor veterans, and the festivities culminate in a military parade at Moscow’s Red Square. Most veterans wear their medals as they head to the parade or an event organized by a local veteran organization.

The National day, celebrated on June 12. On this day, in 1990, Russian parliament formally declared Russian sovereignty from the USSR. The holiday was officially established in 1992. People may attend concerts and fireworks that take place in many cities throughout the country. Prominent Russian writers, scientists and humanitarian workers receive State Awards from the President of Russia on this day. Most public offices and schools are closed on June 12.

The National day, celebrated on June 12. On this day, in 1990, Russian parliament formally declared Russian sovereignty from the USSR. The holiday was officially established in 1992. People may attend concerts and fireworks that take place in many cities throughout the country. Prominent Russian writers, scientists and humanitarian workers receive State Awards from the President of Russia on this day. Most public offices and schools are closed on June 12.

Easter- The day before Easter all churches hold night services and organize religious processions around churches. By that time, kulich, the traditional holiday baking symbolizing the body of Christ, had been already baked and Easter eggs painted. The morning starts from visiting neighbors and giving away Easter eggs.

Easter- The day before Easter all churches hold night services and organize religious processions around churches. By that time, kulich, the traditional holiday baking symbolizing the body of Christ, had been already baked and Easter eggs painted. The morning starts from visiting neighbors and giving away Easter eggs.

On 1 September 1984, the Supreme Council of the USSR officially designated the first of September as the official ‘Day of Knowledge’. On this day, schools put on a special celebration to mark the start of the year – teachers and pupils assemble to listen to songs and poetry; congratulatory and inspirational speeches are given by the schools’ head teachers and, sometimes, by members of the local administration.

On 1 September 1984, the Supreme Council of the USSR officially designated the first of September as the official ‘Day of Knowledge’. On this day, schools put on a special celebration to mark the start of the year – teachers and pupils assemble to listen to songs and poetry; congratulatory and inspirational speeches are given by the schools’ head teachers and, sometimes, by members of the local administration.