Explore Ancient Mesopotamia, Sumerian, and more!

Very old tablet; works always!   Babylonian Stone Tablet used in the research and assembly of a 21-volume dictionary of the language of ancient Mesopotamia and its Babylonian and Assyrian dialects. Unspoken for 2,000 years but preserved on clay tablets and in stone inscriptions deciphered over the last two centuries. Dictionary finally completed by scholars at the University of Chicago. There are now explanations and the ability to study Cuniform writing of the 4th millennium BC by the…

Ancient Assyrian Dictionary Completed by University of Chicago Scholars

BABYLONIAN GRAMMATICAL TEXT STONE (used in the research and assembly of a dictionary of the language of ancient Mesopotamia and its Babylonian and Assyrian dialects, both unspoken for years, preserved on clay tablets and in stone inscriptions)

The 4000 year old clay tablet containing the story of the flood stands on display at the British Museum in London.

The 4000 year old clay tablet containing the story of the Ark and the flood stands on display at the British Museum in London. According to a book by Irving Finkel of the British Museum.

Sumerian is the earliest known writing system. Its origins can be traced back to about 8,000 BC. It developed from the pictographs and other symbols used to represent trade transactions on clay tablets. Sumerian was written in Sumer in from perhaps the 4th millennium BC until about 2,000 BC, when it was replaced by Akkadian as written language of Sumerians. Sumerian is closely resembles to Etruscan and related civilizations

early sumerian pictographic tablet 3100 BCE Clay Tablet Carved using a wedged stylus Sumeria T-Sumerian Pictographic Tablet A-Prehistoric people or scribes BCE M-Clay T-Engraving U-Record Keeping

The Sun-god Shamash in his Shrine.    Stone tablet of Nebopaliddin, King of Babylonia (c . 880 B.C.), representing Shamash, the sun-god of Sippar, seated in his shrine with the king (second figure) led into the god’s presence by a priest, and followed by A, the consort of Shamash—the goddess interceding, as it were, on behalf of the king.

The Sun-god Shamash of Sippar in his Shrine. Stone tablet of Nebopaliddin, King of Babylonia, seated in his shrine with the king led into the god’s presence by a priest.

Dr Irving Finkel, Assistant Keeper of the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, translated the cuneiform script on the tablet. There are dozens of ancient tablets that have been found which describe the flood story but Finkel, Assistant Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian script, languages and cultures Department at the British Museum, says this one is the first to describe the vessel's shape.

Ancient Babylonian text reveals Noah's Ark was a coracle made of reeds

Dr Irving Finkel, Assistant Keeper of the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, translated the cuneiform script on the tablet.

The Flood Tablet, relating part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, From Nineveh, northern Iraq, Neo-Assyrian, 7th century BC, most famous cuneiform tablet from Mesopotamia, at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Jessica Spengler.  I would never have realized this is language!

ancientart: The most famous cuneiform tablet from Mesopotamia The Flood Tablet, relating part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, From Nineveh, north.

The Earliest Autograph Signatures (Circa 3,100 BCE)    A pictographic list of titles and professions in ancient Sumeria (top), with the scribe's signature on the reverse side (bottom.) (View Larger)    Pictographic lexical lists written in ancient Sumerian pictographic script on clay tablets are the earliest literature known, and also the earliest known evidence of school and learning.

The Earliest Autograph Signatures (Circa BCE) A pictographic list of titles and professions in ancient Sumeria (top), with the scribe's signature on the reverse side (bottom.

Recently discovered Assyrian clay tablet: Your homeland has been taken over by a foreign power. You are forced to move to a frontier town far from your home and work in the palace of the governor. Your name, perhaps the only link to your mother tongue, is recorded in the household accounts in the local script.

Unknown language found stamped in ancient clay tablet In deciphering the tablet seen above, John MacGinnis of the University of Cambridge found that many of the names on the list are not from any currently known ancient language.

Ancient dictionary from Uruk, thought to be one of the first. Dates to the middle of 1st millenium BC. Louvre Museum

Bibliophilia on

ancientart: “Ancient dictionary from Warka, Uruk, thought to be one of the first. Dates to the middle of millenium BC, and is currently located at the Louvre, France.

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