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USS Montana Class, the last best dream class

USS Montana Class, the last best battleship class.

Inspiration & Visual Research for Voyage to Obliteration graphic novel. U-Boats.

Germany initiated the war partially with their newly implemented U-Boats. The use of U-boats led to many british civilian casualties giving yet another reason for the british to join the war cause.

Submarine entrance | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Inspiration for the inside of the Might of Fortitude.

Care for her through the YWCA (lodging and a safe place for women come to cities to do war work)

World War 1 Poster

Gato by Piotr Forkasiewicz, via Behance

Gato submarine illustration done for book cover in cooperation with Waldemar Góralski (waldemar.goralski author of this fantastic Gato submarine model.

Look at what our navy had during ww2! Made 15 years prior but still! War front because its a war ship

USS Texas (BB Some of the most impressive technology seen from the war. The USS Texas is a battleship in the U. Navy, and Navy that would become the largest in the world.

Cero (SS-225) of the US Navy - American Submarine of the Gato class - Allied Warships of WWII - uboat.net

Cero of the US Navy - American Submarine of the Gato class - Allied Warships of WWII

Flounder (SS-251) of the US Navy - American Submarine of the Gato class - Allied Warships of WWII - uboat.net

Flounder of the US Navy - American Submarine of the Gato class - Allied Warships of WWII

in the Second World War, a small Yokosuka E-14Y1 [Glenn] scouting floatplane launched from the Japanese submarine I-7 conducted a reconnaissance flight over Pearl Harbor after the attack to assess damage. Later, off Oregon, the I-25 launched another E-14Y1 that, in two attacks, dropped four phosphorous bombs triggering small forest fires; other Japanese submarines used these airplanes to conduct reconnaissance flights over the Aleutians, Australia, New Zealand, Madagascar, and Africa. Japan…

Daily Lazy: WWII Japanese submarine aircraft carrier + video

This photo from 1943 shows the mass production of U-boot on a german shipyard. For minimizing the damage caused by aerial attacks, the parts of these submarines were produced in separated and distant places, to be later transported to the shipyards where the submarines could be then quickly assembled and equipped.

This photo from 1943 shows the mass production of U-boot on a german shipyard. For minimizing the damage caused by aerial attacks, the parts of these submarines were produced in separated and distant places, to be later transported to the shipyards where the submarines could be then quickly assembled and equipped.

U-boats were German submarines that caused havoc in World War Two during the Battle of the Atlantic. U-boats were so damaging that Winston Churchill commented that it was the only time in World War Two that he thought Britain would have to contemplate surrendering.

U-boats caused havoc in World War Two during the Battle of the Atlantic. U-boats were so damaging that Winston Churchill commented that it was the only time in World War Two that he thought Britain would have to contemplate surrendering.

HMS Hood by chris-parker, via Flickr   The mighty Hood sent to the bottom by the Bismark from 15 miles away!

HMS Hood, The largest battlecruiser ever built, she famously confirmed the fundamental flaw in the concept when she came up against the modern German battleship Bismarck in May being fatally vulnerable to heavy calibre plunging fire.

Enigma Machine - Enigma Machine    During World War II, the Germans used the Enigma, a cipher machine, to develop nearly unbreakable codes for sending messages. The Enigma's settings offered 150,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible solutions, yet the Allies were eventually able to crack its code. By end of the war, 10 percent of all German Enigma communications were decoded at Bletchley Park, in England, on the world’s first electromagnetic computers.

The Enigma's settings offered possible solutions, yet the Allies were eventually able to crack its code.

HMS Duke of York was one of Britain's five 14 in King George V class battleships, designed in the 1930s to 35000 ton Washington Treaty tonnage limits.  She was flagship of the force that sank German battleship Scharnhorst on Boxing Day 1943 in a purely surface action, with no air involvement.  Of the class only Prince of Wales (sunk by Japanese aircraft in December 1941) did not survive WW2.

HMS Duke of York - King George V-class battleship - I think that she was one of 3 battleships we saw in Devonport Dockyard in 1957 when on a boat trip around Plymouth. The others were HMS Howe & 1 other.

The calculated gyro angle – together with the torpedo spread angle – was transmitted by means of selsyn links to the gyro angle receivers that were located in the forward and aft torpedo rooms. The active gyro angle receiver was selected by means of the right hand rotary switch located on the aiming subsystem control box front panel, which was installed in the control room (under the chart table).

The calculated gyro angle – together with the torpedo spread angle – was transmitted by means of selsyn links to the gyro angle receivers that were located in the forward and aft torpedo rooms.  The active gyro angle receiver was selected by means of the right hand rotary switch located on the aiming subsystem control box front panel, which was installed in the control room (under the chart table).
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