Explore Fort Lee, George Washington Bridge, and more!

THe Paterno Castle with the newly built GW Bridge in the background. The pillars in the bottom left corner of the photograph still stand today though the castle was demolished.

THe Paterno Castle with the newly built GW Bridge in the background. The pillars in the bottom left corner of the photograph still stand today thought the castle was demolished.

What Madison Square Garden used to look like back in 1925. Follow Sneak Outfitters for more sneak peaks at New York City. www.sneakoutfitters.com

Madison Square Garden, 1924 The second Madison Square Garden, seen here decorated for the 1924 Democratic National Convention, was located at East Street and Madison Avenue, where the New York Life Building stands today.

Cowboy on 13th Street and 11th Avenue in the Meatpacking District circa 1911, George Grantham Bain Collection, via Shorpy.com

The Lost Cow Tunnels of New York City

New York Central Railroad - Meat Packing District - Eleventh* Avenue West Street - ca. 1911 Man on horse is a NYCRR Watchman / RR Policeman a/k/a "West Side Cowboy" escorting the locomotive as required by NY City law.

Riverside Drive, New York City, 1908. Electric tour bus.

Circa "Riverside Drive, New York." Tourists in an electric charabanc or "automobile bus." glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co.

Downtown Manhattan, New York City, 1915, including Bankers Trust, Equitable Building, Liberty Tower and the Singer Building

Downtown Manhattan, New York City, including Bankers Trust, Equitable Building, Liberty Tower and the Singer Building

Hell’s Kitchen, by Sarah Albee: There are competing stories about how the neighborhood got its name. According to my favorite one (which is tough to substantiate), a veteran cop was watching a disturbance on 39th and 10th Avenue, in the mid-1800s, with his rookie partner. The rookie is supposed to have said, “This place is Hell itself,” to which the veteran cop replied, “Hell’s a mild climate. This is Hell’s Kitchen.”  History of a neighborhood.

Slum Life In New York City During the Nineteenth Century's Gilded Age - Hells Kitchen NYC vintage photo

Old house being torn down on a back lot, Bleecker Street and Greene Street, c1890. Photo by Jacob Riis. Photo from the Museum of the City of New York.

Old house being torn down on a back lot, Bleecker Street and Greene Street, Photo by Jacob Riis. Photo from the Museum of the City of New York.

Battery Park City landfill, NY Telephone Company, abandoned West Side Highway and the World Trade Center. 1974 New York

Battery Park City landfill, NY Telephone Company, abandoned West Side Highway and the World Trade Center, 1974

The first licensed pizzeria in the USA, Lombardi’s, at 53 1/2 Spring St. in NYC. Gennaro Lombardi and his pizza maker, Antonio Totonno Pero. Late Gilded Age NYC c.1905.

The first licensed pizzeria in the USA, Lombardi’s, at 53 Spring St. in NYC. Gennaro Lombardi and his pizza maker, Antonio Totonno Pero. Late Gilded Age NYC now about a block away at Mott St & Spring St.

"Harlem River Speedway and Washington Bridge viewed from High Bridge." New York ca 1905.

New York circa 1905 Harlem River Speedway and Washington Bridge viewed from High Bridge <> Dry plate glass negative

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