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Terracotta antefix, representing the head of Juno Lanuvian. Early 5th century B.C. Rome, National Etruscan Museum of Villa Julia.

Terracotta antefix, representing the head of Juno Lanuvian. Early 5th century B.C. Rome, National Etruscan Museum of Villa Julia.

Terracotta statue of a young woman - The elaborate necklaces and armband on this statue appear to be reproduced from molds of actual jewelry. Some of the pendants are decorated with reliefs depicting various Etruscan deities and heroes. Originally, this woman wore a pair of grape-cluster earrings. When complete, the statue probably stood in a sanctuary and showed the young woman holding an incense box in her extended right hand - Etruscan - late 4th- early 3rd century BC

Terracotta statue of a young woman - The elaborate necklaces and armband on this statue appear to be reproduced from molds of actual jewelry. Some of the pendants are decorated with reliefs depicting various Etruscan deities and heroes. Originally, this woman wore a pair of grape-cluster earrings. When complete, the statue probably stood in a sanctuary and showed the young woman holding an incense box in her extended right hand - Etruscan - late 4th- early 3rd century BC

The divine protectress Juno Sospita, molded in terracotta and painted in vibrant red and black, once smiled from the roof of an early-fifth-century B.C. Etruscan temple. Worshiped throughout central Italy as a guardian of cities, the deity wears her characteristic colorful helmet, with checkered crest, goat ears and horns (one of each is missing), and stylized palm branch.

The divine protectress Juno Sospita, molded in terracotta and painted in vibrant red and black, once smiled from the roof of an early-fifth-century B.C. Etruscan temple. Worshiped throughout central Italy as a guardian of cities, the deity wears her characteristic colorful helmet, with checkered crest, goat ears and horns (one of each is missing), and stylized palm branch.

The Divine Mother seems to have been humanity's earliest spiritual experience. The terracotta figurines of the Mother Goddess, recovered in excavations are not only the earliest manifestations of the Divine Power ever known in any medium, but are also suggestive of a well-evolved Mother Goddess worship cult.  Juno-Sospita (Altes Museum, Berlin) | Etruscan

The Divine Mother seems to have been humanity's earliest spiritual experience. The terracotta figurines of the Mother Goddess, recovered in excavations are not only the earliest manifestations of the Divine Power ever known in any medium, but are also suggestive of a well-evolved Mother Goddess worship cult. Juno-Sospita (Altes Museum, Berlin) | Etruscan

an etruscan terracotta portrait head o | heads | sotheby's n08918lot6mkjten

an etruscan terracotta portrait head o | heads | sotheby's n08918lot6mkjten

AN ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX   CIRCA 6TH CENTURY B.C.   Molded in the form of a panther head, with rounded ears and large bulging eyes, two protruding knobs above, the mane a flange encircling the jowls, the long nose merging with the exaggerated muzzle, painted with black and red details including eyelashes, the arching tile projecting from the back of the head  9½ in. (24.1 cm.) high

AN ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX CIRCA 6TH CENTURY B.C. Molded in the form of a panther head, with rounded ears and large bulging eyes, two protruding knobs above, the mane a flange encircling the jowls, the long nose merging with the exaggerated muzzle, painted with black and red details including eyelashes, the arching tile projecting from the back of the head 9½ in. (24.1 cm.) high

An Etruscan terracotta female votive bust, ca. 3rd-2nd centuries BCE.  With lidded articulated eyes and elaborately coiffed hair, centre- parted and falling into ringlets on either side, wearing large inverted pyramidal earrings and a necklace of large pendants decorated with relief figures of various heroes and deities, a mantle pulled up over the back of her head, preserving traces of red, pink and yellow pigment.

An Etruscan terracotta female votive bust, ca. 3rd-2nd centuries BCE. With lidded articulated eyes and elaborately coiffed hair, centre- parted and falling into ringlets on either side, wearing large inverted pyramidal earrings and a necklace of large pendants decorated with relief figures of various heroes and deities, a mantle pulled up over the back of her head, preserving traces of red, pink and yellow pigment.

Head of Aphrodite figure - Etruscan Terracotta, found Temple at Pygi on Santa Severa, circa 4th c. B.C. - at the Etruscan Museum, Rome

Head of Aphrodite figure - Etruscan Terracotta, found Temple at Pygi on Santa Severa, circa 4th c. B.C. - at the Etruscan Museum, Rome

AN ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX   CIRCA 4TH CENTURY B.C.   Molded in the form of a facing veiled female head, perhaps a maenad, her hair center parted, wearing a diadem ornamented with disks, and a thick necklace, originally framed by a shell-shaped fan with palmettes in relief, a tendril preserved to the right, the remains of pigment throughout, including white for the face, pink for the lips, black for the eyes and red for the hair  7¼ in. (18.4 cm.) high

AN ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA ANTEFIX CIRCA 4TH CENTURY B.C. Molded in the form of a facing veiled female head, perhaps a maenad, her hair center parted, wearing a diadem ornamented with disks, and a thick necklace, originally framed by a shell-shaped fan with palmettes in relief, a tendril preserved to the right, the remains of pigment throughout, including white for the face, pink for the lips, black for the eyes and red for the hair 7¼ in. (18.4 cm.) high

AN ETRUSCAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM CIRCA LATE 3RD-EARLY 2ND CENTURY B.C.

AN ETRUSCAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM CIRCA LATE 3RD-EARLY 2ND CENTURY B.C.

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