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Pendeen (from Cornish: Penn Din, otherwise known as Boskaswal Wartha) is a village on the Penwith peninsula in Cornwall. It is 3 miles (4.8 km) north-northeast of St Just and 7 miles (11.3 km) west of Penzance. It lies along the B3306 road which connects St Ives to Land's End and the A30 road. The village has a community centre, a shop, a post office, a primary school, and a few small businesses. Community activities include an art club, a gardening club, silver marching band and a football…

Pendeen (from Cornish: Penn Din, otherwise known as Boskaswal Wartha) is a village on the Penwith peninsula in Cornwall. It is 3 miles (4.8 km) north-northeast of St Just and 7 miles (11.3 km) west of Penzance. It lies along the B3306 road which connects St Ives to Land's End and the A30 road. The village has a community centre, a shop, a post office, a primary school, and a few small businesses. Community activities include an art club, a gardening club, silver marching band and a football…

St Levan (Cornish: Selevan) is a civil parish and village in Cornwall. The village is about eight miles (12.7 km) south west of Penzance. St Levan lies within the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Almost a third of Cornwall has AONB designation, with the same status and protection as a National Park. The parish encompasses the settlements of St Levan, Trethewey, Treen (the chief village), and Porthcurno and shares boundaries with the parishes of Sennen in the north-west, St…

St Levan (Cornish: Selevan) is a civil parish and village in Cornwall. The village is about eight miles (12.7 km) south west of Penzance. St Levan lies within the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Almost a third of Cornwall has AONB designation, with the same status and protection as a National Park. The parish encompasses the settlements of St Levan, Trethewey, Treen (the chief village), and Porthcurno and shares boundaries with the parishes of Sennen in the north-west, St…

Carn Marth (Cornish: Karn Margh) is the name of a hill in Cornwall near Redruth. It is 235 m (771 ft) high, and is well known for the granite quarried from it in the past.  Geography and history:  Carn Marth lies 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) southeast of Redruth and is part of the Carnmenellis granite plateau, the 'Carnmenellis Granite', one of several granite plutons in Cornwall that make up part of the Cornubian batholith.  In prehistoric times men settled on the uplands as they had many…

Carn Marth (Cornish: Karn Margh) is the name of a hill in Cornwall near Redruth. It is 235 m (771 ft) high, and is well known for the granite quarried from it in the past. Geography and history: Carn Marth lies 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) southeast of Redruth and is part of the Carnmenellis granite plateau, the 'Carnmenellis Granite', one of several granite plutons in Cornwall that make up part of the Cornubian batholith. In prehistoric times men settled on the uplands as they had many…

Cadgwith (Cornish: Porthkajwydh, meaning cove of the thicket) is a village and fishing port in Cornwall, It is on the Lizard Peninsula between The Lizard and Coverack.  The village has its origins in medieval times as a collection of fish cellars in a she

Cadgwith (Cornish: Porthkajwydh, meaning cove of the thicket) is a village and fishing port in Cornwall, It is on the Lizard Peninsula between The Lizard and Coverack. The village has its origins in medieval times as a collection of fish cellars in a she

St Allen (Cornish: Eglosallen) is a civil parish in Cornwall. The church town of St Allen is an isolated hamlet and the main settlement in the parish is Zelah which is situated on the A30 trunk road four miles (6.5 km) north of Truro .  The population in the 2001 census was 435 people and the parish occupies 3,506 acres (14.19 km2) of land.   History:   The manor of Cargoll included St Allen and it was in the possession of the bishops of Exeter from 1269 (the manor house was at Lanner)…

St Allen (Cornish: Eglosallen) is a civil parish in Cornwall. The church town of St Allen is an isolated hamlet and the main settlement in the parish is Zelah which is situated on the A30 trunk road four miles (6.5 km) north of Truro . The population in the 2001 census was 435 people and the parish occupies 3,506 acres (14.19 km2) of land. History: The manor of Cargoll included St Allen and it was in the possession of the bishops of Exeter from 1269 (the manor house was at Lanner)…

St Mawes (Cornish: Lannvowsedh) is a small town opposite Falmouth, at the mouth of the River Fal on the Roseland Peninsula on the south coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It lies on the east bank of the Carrick Roads, a large waterway created after the Ice Age from an ancient valley which flooded as the melt waters caused the sea level to rise dramatically, creating an immense natural harbour, often claimed to be the third largest in the world. The town is in the civil parish of St…

St Mawes (Cornish: Lannvowsedh) is a small town opposite Falmouth, at the mouth of the River Fal on the Roseland Peninsula on the south coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It lies on the east bank of the Carrick Roads, a large waterway created after the Ice Age from an ancient valley which flooded as the melt waters caused the sea level to rise dramatically, creating an immense natural harbour, often claimed to be the third largest in the world. The town is in the civil parish of St…

Newquay (Cornish: Tewynblustr) is a town, civil parish, seaside resort and fishing port in Cornwall. It is situated on the North Atlantic coast of Cornwall approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Bodmin and 12 miles (19 km) north of Truro.  The town is bounded to the west by the River Gannel and its associated salt marsh, and to the east by the Porth Valley. Newquay has been expanding inland (south) since it was founded.  In 2001, the census recorded a permanent population of 19,562.

Newquay (Cornish: Tewynblustr) is a town, civil parish, seaside resort and fishing port in Cornwall. It is situated on the North Atlantic coast of Cornwall approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Bodmin and 12 miles (19 km) north of Truro. The town is bounded to the west by the River Gannel and its associated salt marsh, and to the east by the Porth Valley. Newquay has been expanding inland (south) since it was founded. In 2001, the census recorded a permanent population of 19,562.

Carbis Bay Carbis is almost contiguous with the town of St Ives and is in St Ives civil parish (part of the area served by St Ives Town Council), which encompasses St Ives, Carbis Bay, Lelant and Halsetown. Lelant, an older settlement, is one mile southeast; the 2001 census gave the combined population of Carbis Bay and Lelant as 3,482.  Carbis Bay overlooks the small bay of the same name (part of St Ives Bay) which is bounded to the north by Porthminster Point and to the east by Hawke's…

Carbis Bay Carbis is almost contiguous with the town of St Ives and is in St Ives civil parish (part of the area served by St Ives Town Council), which encompasses St Ives, Carbis Bay, Lelant and Halsetown. Lelant, an older settlement, is one mile southeast; the 2001 census gave the combined population of Carbis Bay and Lelant as 3,482. Carbis Bay overlooks the small bay of the same name (part of St Ives Bay) which is bounded to the north by Porthminster Point and to the east by Hawke's…

Rame Head or Ram Head (Cornish: Penn an Hordh) is a coastal headland, southwest of the village of Rame in southeast Cornwall.  The site was used for a promontory hill fort in the Iron Age. The headland has a prominent chapel, dedicated to St Michael, accessible by a steep footpath. The chapel was first licensed for Mass in 1397 and is probably on the site of a much earlier, Celtic, hermitage. It remains as an intact shell. Earl Ordulf, who was the owner of vast estates in the West Country…

Rame Head or Ram Head (Cornish: Penn an Hordh) is a coastal headland, southwest of the village of Rame in southeast Cornwall. The site was used for a promontory hill fort in the Iron Age. The headland has a prominent chapel, dedicated to St Michael, accessible by a steep footpath. The chapel was first licensed for Mass in 1397 and is probably on the site of a much earlier, Celtic, hermitage. It remains as an intact shell. Earl Ordulf, who was the owner of vast estates in the West Country…

Four Lanes (Cornish: Peder Bownder) is a village in west Cornwall, England, approximately three miles (5 kilometres) south of Redruth, in the civil parish of Carn Brea.  Pencoys is a smaller settlement which adjoins Four Lanes immediately to the south.  Four Lanes and Pencoys are on the upland plateau of the Carnmenellis granite batholith. Four Lanes village centre is 220 metres (720 feet) above sea level.  The village is centred on The Square which is at a crossroads where the…

Four Lanes (Cornish: Peder Bownder) is a village in west Cornwall, England, approximately three miles (5 kilometres) south of Redruth, in the civil parish of Carn Brea. Pencoys is a smaller settlement which adjoins Four Lanes immediately to the south. Four Lanes and Pencoys are on the upland plateau of the Carnmenellis granite batholith. Four Lanes village centre is 220 metres (720 feet) above sea level. The village is centred on The Square which is at a crossroads where the…

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