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When the U.S. Navy took over Ice Island T3, the name "Fletchers Ice Island T3" returned to cachets. The island periodically floated free of its grounding and remained in continuous use until 1974.

Navy took over Ice Island the name "Fletchers Ice Island returned to cachets. The island periodically floated free of its grounding and remained in continuous use until

ARLIS I  In May 1960, Ice Island T3 went aground near Wainwright, Alaska making study programs ineffective. The island was abandoned again with the station left intact for possible future use. As an alternative, the U.S. Navy established a new drift station designated ARLIS I. The freely floating island was only half the size of T3 and was serviced from Fairbanks and Barrow.

ARLIS I In May 1960, Ice Island T3 went aground near Wainwright, Alaska making study programs ineffective. The island was abandoned again with the station left intact for possible future use. As an alternative, the U.S. Navy established a new drift station designated ARLIS I. The freely floating island was only half the size of T3 and was serviced from Fairbanks and Barrow.

The MacMillan Expedition to northern Greenland carried three U.S. Navy amphibians, commanded by Lt. Richard E. Byrd. They made aerial surveys possible for the first time

The MacMillan Expedition to northern Greenland carried three U. Navy amphibians, commanded by Lt. Richard E. They made aerial surveys possible for the first time

A discarded navy submarine was used in a 1931 experiment to test its ability to sail under the ice. The age of the submarine did not permit a successful test, but the theory led to later cruises under the ice by nuclear submarines. This cover originated in the Falkland Islands during the Wilkins studies of Graham Land and carried to the new expedition. An extensive amount of philatelic mail was accepted by the expedition.

A discarded navy submarine was used in a 1931 experiment to test its ability to sail under the ice. The age of the submarine did not permit a successful test, but the theory led to later cruises under the ice by nuclear submarines. This cover originated in the Falkland Islands during the Wilkins studies of Graham Land and carried to the new expedition. An extensive amount of philatelic mail was accepted by the expedition.

The Navy Landed Aircraft on Ice Floes to Conduct Studies   Operation Skijump II

The Navy Landed Aircraft on Ice Floes to Conduct Studies Operation Skijump II

The MacMillan Expedition to northern Greenland carried three U.S. Navy amphibians, commanded by Lt. Richard E. Byrd. They made aerial surveys possible for the first time

The MacMillan Expedition to northern Greenland carried three U. Navy amphibians, commanded by Lt. Richard E. They made aerial surveys possible for the first time

Conventional submarines like the USS HALFBEAK were restricted to activities on the edge of the pack during under-ice activities.  The USS HALFBEAK did not have postal ficilities and all mail was delivered to the post office in New York upon arrival. The cachet was prepared for the US Navy by the American Society of Polar Philatelists.

Conventional submarines like the USS HALFBEAK were restricted to activities on the edge of the pack during under-ice activities. The USS HALFBEAK did not have postal ficilities and all mail was delivered to the post office in New York upon arrival. The cachet was prepared for the US Navy by the American Society of Polar Philatelists.

ARLIS I  In May 1960, Ice Island T3 went aground near Wainwright, Alaska making study programs ineffective. The island was abandoned again with the station left intact for possible future use. As an alternative, the U.S. Navy established a new drift station designated ARLIS I. The freely floating island was only half the size of T3 and was serviced from Fairbanks and Barrow.

ARLIS I In May 1960, Ice Island T3 went aground near Wainwright, Alaska making study programs ineffective. The island was abandoned again with the station left intact for possible future use. As an alternative, the U.S. Navy established a new drift station designated ARLIS I. The freely floating island was only half the size of T3 and was serviced from Fairbanks and Barrow.

The grounded Ice Island T3 was officially transferred to the US Navy in 1960 on a "Where is" and "As is" basis. During the final season under Air Force administration, the designation "Bravo" finally began to appear on cachets, however the change was not complete.

The grounded Ice Island T3 was officially transferred to the US Navy in 1960 on a "Where is" and "As is" basis. During the final season under Air Force administration, the designation "Bravo" finally began to appear on cachets, however the change was not complete.

At the beginning of World War II, Jan Mayen Island (in the Greenland Sea) was known as Island X, a location of strategic value as a meteorological station. All mail was canceled with the Norwegian Navy ship cancellation. Early in the 1950's the meteorological station was upgraded and the staff enlarged so that they were serviced by regular supply boats that carried mail to Tromso for servicing. A new and distinctive cancellation was used on later mail.

At the beginning of World War II, Jan Mayen Island (in the Greenland Sea) was known as Island X, a location of strategic value as a meteorological station. All mail was canceled with the Norwegian Navy ship cancellation. Early in the 1950's the meteorological station was upgraded and the staff enlarged so that they were serviced by regular supply boats that carried mail to Tromso for servicing. A new and distinctive cancellation was used on later mail.

The grounded Ice Island T3 was officially transferred to the US Navy in 1960 on a "Where is" and "As is" basis. During the final season under Air Force administration, the designation "Bravo" finally began to appear on cachets, however the change was not complete.

The grounded Ice Island T3 was officially transferred to the US Navy in 1960 on a "Where is" and "As is" basis. During the final season under Air Force administration, the designation "Bravo" finally began to appear on cachets, however the change was not complete.

When the U.S. Navy took over Ice Island T3, the name "Fletchers Ice Island T3" returned to cachets. The island periodically floated free of its grounding and remained in continuous use until 1974.

Navy took over Ice Island the name "Fletchers Ice Island returned to cachets. The island periodically floated free of its grounding and remained in continuous use until

Official letter dated 27 July 1928 from the Northern Administration of the Merchant Navy, Att: leader of the expedition to rescue the airship ITALIA, Professor Wiese.  Please advise financial documents which confirm our expenses for the expedition and turn them back to us.  Signed by the Chief Accountant and the Manager.

Arctic Postal History: Umberto Nobile & the Search for the Italia

The final cachets used on mail from the floating ice island during 1960 finally omitted reference to T3. The ice station was transferred to the US Navy the following year.

The final cachets used on mail from the floating ice island during 1960 finally omitted reference to T3. The ice station was transferred to the US Navy the following year.

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