Explore Scarification Tattoo, Egyptian Tattoo, and more!

An ancient Egyptian faience figurine of a naked woman with a tattooed body and a belt of cowrie shells, a symbol of femininity. (Louvre Museum)

This delightful statuette resembles a bright blue faience doll. Its elegant nudity and totally unrealistic color make it an attractive object, but the raison d'être of this anonymous character, fashioned without legs, remains something of a mystery.

Skin Color of Ancient Hebrews | this is a reddish brown bust of king Tut

Some black girls have really lush voices. I wonder what songs the ones in Egypt used to sing like 10 thousand years ago.

Capital / Eighteenth Dynasty / Deir El-Bahari / Egypt / Penn Museum.

Capital / Eighteenth Dynasty / Deir El-Bahari / Egypt / Penn Museum.

Concubine of the Dead  --  Theban Necropolis, Tomb of Neferhotep  --  11th Dynasty, Reign of Mentuhotep  --  2061-2010 BCE  --  Blue Faience  --  Cairo Antiquity Museum

Concubine of the Dead -- Theban Necropolis, Tomb of Neferhotep -- Dynasty, Reign of Mentuhotep -- BCE -- Blue Faience -- Cairo Antiquity Museum

The Woman Tjepu, from Thebes, Tomb 181, New Kingdom. Tjepu was a noblewoman about forty years old when this painting was executed, but she is shown in what was the height of youthful fashion during the reign of Amunhotep III: a perfumed cone on her heavy wig, a delicate side tress, and a semitransparent, fringed linen dress.

Ancient Egypt: The Lady Tjepu, holding a Menat beaded percussion necklace.Thebes, Tomb New Kingdom, ancient Egypt.

Hathor Figurine Egypt, 1938-1630 BCE The Brooklyn Museum "Statuettes of naked women with incomplete legs, like this example, have been found in Middle Kingdom tombs and houses. Early Egyptologists mistakenly identified them as concubines intended to provide the spirits of men with an eternity of sexual pleasure. Recent studies show that both men and women used these figures to ensure fertility. In the home, they were believed to enhance a wifes fruitfulness and a husbands ...

Hathor Figurine Egypt, BC The Brooklyn Museum “Statuettes of naked women with incomplete legs, like this example, have been found in Middle Kingdom tombs and houses. Early Egyptologists mistakenly identified them as concubines intended to.

Goddess Figurine  This piece, a clay figurine of a female from the Samarra period, was found at Tell Songor A. The 10.2 cm statue dates back to 5000 BC. Cool link where image turns slowly to view from any angle.

Goddess Figurine This piece, a clay figurine of a female from the Samarra period, was found at Tell Songor A. The cm statue dates back to 5000 BC. Cool link where image turns slowly to view from any angle.

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