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A CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY BLOCK-FRONT CHEST-OF-DRAWERS -  BOSTON, 1760-1780 -  31½ in. high, 35¾ in. wide, 20½ in. deep

A CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY BLOCK-FRONT CHEST-OF-DRAWERS - BOSTON, 1760-1780 - 31½ in. high, 35¾ in. wide, 20½ in. deep

Fruitwood Veneered Commode. Artist : Grohé Frères. Technique : Marquetry. Period of creation : 1870. Country of creation : France .

Place of origin:paris (probably, made) (made) Artist/Maker:Unknown Materials and Techniques:Mahogany veneered on oak and poplar, with lacquered brass mounts and a white marble top

1780 Chippendale Mahogany Secretaire Bureau, England

Chippendale Mahogany Secretaire Bureau, England

For Sale on - This is a wonderfully constructed secretaire or bureau, all composed of mahogany solids. Each solid drawer front exhibits the striking

A Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Mahogany Block-Front Tray-Top Chest of Drawers, possibly Colchester-Norwich area, Connecticut circa 1780  retains a historic finish and also appears to retain its original rare pierced brass hardware.   Height 36 1/4 in. by Width 37 in. by Depth 19 5/8

A Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Mahogany Block-Front Tray-Top Chest of Drawers, possibly Colchester-Norwich area, Connecticut, circa Sotheby's

American Antique Chippendale scroll top mahogany bombe chest on chest. Fabulous piece, made in Boston or Massachusetts 18th century.

American Antique Chippendale scroll top mahogany bombe chest on chest. Fabulous piece, made in Massachusetts century.

The most original American furniture was made in Newport, Rhode Island by the Townsend and Goddard families. The shell motif is a characteristic of Newport furniture, and here the blocking on the lower drawers continues upward to the bookcase

The most original American furniture was made in Newport, Rhode Island by the Townsend and Goddard families. The shell motif is a characteristic of Newport furniture, and here the blocking on the lower drawers continues upward to the bookcase

Desk-and-bookcase (1775), by Nathaniel Gould.

Bewitching Wood in Salem

In the days before the proliferation of printed labels, cabinetmakers signed only their best piece. The blocked desk-and-bookcase, circa at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City is Gould's only signed piece

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