Explore Extinct Animals, Prehistoric Animals, and more!

Hallucigenia: a Burgess Shale fossil. The Burgess Shale Formation in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the world's most famous fossil fields. At 505 million years (Middle Cambrian) old, it is one of the earliest fossil beds containing exceptionally well preserved soft-part fossils.

The Strangest Cambrian Creatures Ever Discovered

Hallucigenia: a Burgess Shale fossil. The Burgess Shale Formation in the…

Some of the oldest marine animals on the planet, including armoured worm-like forms and giant, lobster like sea creatures, survived millions of years longer than previously thought, according to a spectacularly preserved fossil formation from southeastern Morocco.

Some of the oldest marine animals on the planet, including armoured worm-like forms and giant, lobster like sea creatures, survived millions of years longer than previously thought, INTERESTING !

Sometime 34 million years ago, a butterfly died. It was a nymphalid, today the largest family of butterflies (and perhaps then, too).Its fossilized remains were entombed in paper shale that has risen to the surface at what is now the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado.

Prehistoric Moths Show Their True Colors

A fossil butterfly from nymphalid, today the largest family of butterflies (and perhaps then, too). Its fossilized remains were entombed in paper shale that has risen to the surface at what is now the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado.

47 million year old Boa snake from the Messel Pit Fossil Site - Senckenberg museum, Frankfurt, Germany. | Photo by Paul Williams, via Flickr. www.IronAmmonitePhotography.com

47 million year old Boa snake. Spent most of day at Senckenberg museum, Frankfurt admiring the famous Messel fossils. by Paul Williams (Iron Ammonite)

Susan "Sue" Hendrickson is an American paleontologist. Hendrickson is best known for her discovery of the remains of a Tyrannosaurus rex in So. Dakota on 8/12/1990. Her discovery was the largest T. rex specimen ever found and one of the most complete skeletons. This skeleton is now known as "Sue" in honor of her discovery. It is on display at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. She has also found other important fossils and artifacts around the world.

Susan "Sue" Hendrickson is an American paleontologist. Hendrickson is best known…

Specimen of Marrella splendens from the Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park (courtesy of Geological Survey of Canada).

Specimen of Marrella splendens from the Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park (courtesy of Geological Survey of Canada)

Aysheaia specimen from the Burgess Shale; Middle Cambrian, definitely looks a lot like a velvet worm.

Ottoia prolifica Walcott, 1911 is a 500 million years old fossil cycloneuralian worm from the Burgess Shale, Canada, British Columbia.

The Cambrian Explosion - Origin of Animals and the Cambrian Explosion - Science - The Burgess Shale.  Acinocricus cricus, part of a lobopod from the Spence Shale.  © Royal Ontario Museum. Photo: Jean-Bernard Caron.

This detail of an ancient fossil animal called a Lobopod, perhaps related to arthropods, looks like a marvelous Louis X!V sunburst. From the Burgess Shale, Alberta.

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