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Greville Matheson MacDonald (1856-1944) was the eldest son of novelist and poet George Macdonald. His bookplate imitates his father’s, which was based on an engraving by William Blake. We read: ‘Corage! God mend al’, an anagram of his father’s name and ‘Per Mare, per Terras, Domum tu erras’, Through the sea, through the lands, you wander homeward. The bookplate occurs in a 1651 edition of Jacob Böhme’s “De signatura rerum, or the signature of all things”, printed in London…

Greville Matheson MacDonald (1856-1944) was the eldest son of novelist and poet George Macdonald. His bookplate imitates his father’s, which was based on an engraving by William Blake. We read: ‘Corage! God mend al’, an anagram of his father’s name and ‘Per Mare, per Terras, Domum tu erras’, Through the sea, through the lands, you wander homeward. The bookplate occurs in a 1651 edition of Jacob Böhme’s “De signatura rerum, or the signature of all things”, printed in London…

[Leo Polak]

[Leo Polak]

In the early 19th century the “Bibliothèque du magnétisme” was founded by Etienne-Félix Hénin de Cuvillers. The series reviewed works in French on the subject of magnetism and occult sciences. This bookplate by the “Bibliothèque du magnétisme” shows a healer in the process of treating a patient. The ‘healing hands’ bookplate occurs in a copy of “Études sur la Mathèse” by the doctor of romantic medicine Jean Malfatti de Montereggio, published in Paris in 1849. www.ritmanlibrary.com

In the early 19th century the “Bibliothèque du magnétisme” was founded by Etienne-Félix Hénin de Cuvillers. The series reviewed works in French on the subject of magnetism and occult sciences. This bookplate by the “Bibliothèque du magnétisme” shows a healer in the process of treating a patient. The ‘healing hands’ bookplate occurs in a copy of “Études sur la Mathèse” by the doctor of romantic medicine Jean Malfatti de Montereggio, published in Paris in 1849. www.ritmanlibrary.com

The bookplate of John Stokes, MD, occurs in a copy of J.B. Craven’s biography of “Dr Robert Fludd. The English Rosicrucian”, published in Kirkwall by William Peace & Son in 1902. The bookplate breathes a late medieval atmosphere – the seated bearded scholar in a skull cap and fur-lined robe poring over a book lying on a lectern - yet the pensive scholar is illuminated by an electric lamp, a humoristic anachronistic detail.  www.ritmanlibrary.com

The bookplate of John Stokes, MD, occurs in a copy of J.B. Craven’s biography of “Dr Robert Fludd. The English Rosicrucian”, published in Kirkwall by William Peace & Son in 1902. The bookplate breathes a late medieval atmosphere – the seated bearded scholar in a skull cap and fur-lined robe poring over a book lying on a lectern - yet the pensive scholar is illuminated by an electric lamp, a humoristic anachronistic detail. www.ritmanlibrary.com

Jacques Callot

Jacques Callot

[Leo Polak]

[Leo Polak]

Knight and the Death, Hans Holbein (II), Hans Lützelburger, 1524 - 1526

Knight and the Death, Hans Holbein (II), Hans Lützelburger, 1524 - 1526

Figure representing 'The Spirit of Sulphur.' Engraving from Leonhard Thurneisser zum Thurn, Quinta essentia ... und Alchemia. Image A013417 from Images from the History of Medicine.

Figure representing 'The Spirit of Sulphur.' Engraving from Leonhard Thurneisser zum Thurn, Quinta essentia ... und Alchemia. Image A013417 from Images from the History of Medicine.

St Nicholas Greek icon

St Nicholas Greek icon

The famous ‘Rosicrucian’ portrait of Paracelsus, with his motto “alterius non sit, qui suus esse potest” (Let no man belong to another who can belong to himself) was used for the bookplate of the Chemisch-pharmazeutische Fabrik Göppingen, which still exists today. The factory was established in 1921 to meet the demand for spagyrical medicines: herbal medicines produced by alchemical methods. The term spagyria was coined by Paracelsus in his “Liber paragranum” (1529-1530)…

The famous ‘Rosicrucian’ portrait of Paracelsus, with his motto “alterius non sit, qui suus esse potest” (Let no man belong to another who can belong to himself) was used for the bookplate of the Chemisch-pharmazeutische Fabrik Göppingen, which still exists today. The factory was established in 1921 to meet the demand for spagyrical medicines: herbal medicines produced by alchemical methods. The term spagyria was coined by Paracelsus in his “Liber paragranum” (1529-1530)…

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