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Artillery Support - In this striking nighttime photograph taken behind Canadian lines at Vimy Ridge, a British naval gun fires in support of the Canadian attack. Approximately 1,000 Allied guns and mortars pounded the ridge prior to the assault, a period called by the German defenders the

Artillery Support - In this striking nighttime photograph taken behind Canadian lines at Vimy Ridge, a British naval gun fires in support of the Canadian attack. Approximately 1,000 Allied guns and mortars pounded the ridge prior to the assault, a period called by the German defenders the

WWI: The Canadians captured more than 4,000 Germans during the Battle of Vimy Ridge. In this photograph, the soldiers in the soft caps are German officers, and perhaps senior enough to warrant the attention of the official Canadian photographer. CWM 19920085-924

WWI: The Canadians captured more than 4,000 Germans during the Battle of Vimy Ridge. In this photograph, the soldiers in the soft caps are German officers, and perhaps senior enough to warrant the attention of the official Canadian photographer. CWM 19920085-924

Canadian Troops, Battle of Vimy Ridge, 1917    The Battle of Vimy Ridge was a First World War battle in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France between four divisions of the Canadian Corps and three divisions of the German Sixth Army. It lasted from 9 to 12 April 1917, as part of the opening phase of the British-led Battle of Arras, a diversionary attack for the French Nivelle Offensive.

Canadian Troops, Battle of Vimy Ridge, 1917 The Battle of Vimy Ridge was a First World War battle in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France between four divisions of the Canadian Corps and three divisions of the German Sixth Army. It lasted from 9 to 12 April 1917, as part of the opening phase of the British-led Battle of Arras, a diversionary attack for the French Nivelle Offensive.

British soldiers on Vimy Ridge, 1917. British and Canadian forces pushed through German defenses at the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April of 191...

World War I in Photos: The Western Front, Part I

British soldiers on Vimy Ridge, 1917. British and Canadian forces pushed through German defenses at the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April of 191...

This aerial photograph illustrates the major trench lines around an unknown sector on Vimy Ridge. The large craters, some ten to 15 metres deep, were made from mine explosions set off by Canadian engineers prior to and during the assault of 9 April 1917. Mines could create great confusion and blow huge gaps in an enemy's defences, but they were also significant obstacles for advancing troops. CWM 19740387-060

This aerial photograph illustrates the major trench lines around an unknown sector on Vimy Ridge. The large craters, some ten to 15 metres deep, were made from mine explosions set off by Canadian engineers prior to and during the assault of 9 April 1917. Mines could create great confusion and blow huge gaps in an enemy's defences, but they were also significant obstacles for advancing troops. CWM 19740387-060

Friday 1 July 2016 marks the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme, the biggest conflict seen on the Western Front during World War I. Here are some of the most arresting photos from the war. Contains graphic images.

The Most Powerful Images Of World War I

Friday 1 July 2016 marks the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme, the biggest conflict seen on the Western Front during World War I. Here are some of the most arresting photos from the war. Contains graphic images.

www.canadiansoldiers.com

www.canadiansoldiers.com

Lance-Bombardier Walter Cooper, 14th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery (R.C.A.), aboard a Landing Ship Tank counting out 105mm. shells which will be fired on D-Day. Southampton, England, 4 June 1944

Lance-Bombardier Walter Cooper, 14th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery (R.C.A.), aboard a Landing Ship Tank counting out 105mm. shells which will be fired on D-Day. Southampton, England, 4 June 1944

The Fighting Newfoundlander monument at Bowering Park stands in recognition of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment - the "Blue Puttees" - (the only Canadian unit) at Gallipoli and later at Beaumont Hamel where 710 of the 801 officers and men who took part in the assault  were casualties.The monument was unveiled on September 13, 1922 in Bowring Park as a memorial to the Newfoundland soldiers who fought in World War I.

The Fighting Newfoundlander monument at Bowering Park stands in recognition of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment - the "Blue Puttees" - (the only Canadian unit) at Gallipoli and later at Beaumont Hamel where 710 of the 801 officers and men who took part in the assault were casualties.The monument was unveiled on September 13, 1922 in Bowring Park as a memorial to the Newfoundland soldiers who fought in World War I.

Massive guns pound Vimy Ridge, April 1917.  DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

Massive guns pound Vimy Ridge, April 1917. DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

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