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Oxburgh hangings c. 1570. Taken from the book 'Icones avium omnium' by Konrad Gesner.

Oxburgh hangings c. 1570. Taken from the book 'Icones avium omnium' by Konrad Gesner.

The Oxburgh Hangings  Object: Panel  Place of origin: Sheffield, England (probably, made)  Date: ca. 1570 (made)  Artist/Maker: Mary Queen of Scots, born 1542 - died 1587 (possibly, maker)  Elizabeth Talbot, born 1527 - died 1608 (possibly, maker)  Materials and Techniques: Embroidered linen canvas with silk, gold and silver threads  Museum number: T.33Z-1955

The Oxburgh Hangings

The Oxburgh Hangings Object: Panel Place of origin: Sheffield, England (probably, made) Date: ca. 1570 (made) Artist/Maker: Mary Queen of Scots, born 1542 - died 1587 (possibly, maker) Elizabeth Talbot, born 1527 - died 1608 (possibly, maker) Materials and Techniques: Embroidered linen canvas with silk, gold and silver threads Museum number: T.33Z-1955

Panel - The Oxburgh Hangings

Panel - The Oxburgh Hangings

Via Slate vond ik deze indrukwekkende kaart uit 1931 met 4000 jaar wereldgeschiedenis.

Via Slate vond ik deze indrukwekkende kaart uit 1931 met 4000 jaar wereldgeschiedenis.

Another beautiful piece of needlework by Mary, Queen of Scots.

Another beautiful piece of needlework by Mary, Queen of Scots.

1570-1585 - Panel possibly made by either Mary Queen of Scots or Elizabeth Talbot - Chosen as a colour reference - England, Great Britain

Panel

1570-1585 - Panel possibly made by either Mary Queen of Scots or Elizabeth Talbot - Chosen as a colour reference - England, Great Britain

This fragment of an embroidered panel depicts the skin of a 'genet' a type of civet cat. It is part of a collection of needlework known as the Oxburgh hangings. They were made between 1570 and about 1585, the work of Mary Queen of Scots during her imprisonment in England and Elizabeth (Bess) Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury. Bess’s husband George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury was responsible for Mary and she stayed at one or other of the Shrewsbury estates.

Panel

This fragment of an embroidered panel depicts the skin of a 'genet' a type of civet cat. It is part of a collection of needlework known as the Oxburgh hangings. They were made between 1570 and about 1585, the work of Mary Queen of Scots during her imprisonment in England and Elizabeth (Bess) Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury. Bess’s husband George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury was responsible for Mary and she stayed at one or other of the Shrewsbury estates.

The thistle and the rose - Detail from the Treaty of Perpetual Peace (1502) between England and Scotland which was cemented by the marriage of James IV of Scotland to Princess Margaret, Henry VII’s daughter. The borders of this document illustrate the thistle (The Scottish/Stuart emblem), the Tudor rose (the Tudor emblem) and the marguerete, representing Margaret.

The thistle and the rose - Detail from the Treaty of Perpetual Peace (1502) between England and Scotland which was cemented by the marriage of James IV of Scotland to Princess Margaret, Henry VII’s daughter. The borders of this document illustrate the thistle (The Scottish/Stuart emblem), the Tudor rose (the Tudor emblem) and the marguerete, representing Margaret.

The Oxburgh Hangings, panel about 1570 Museum no. T.33II-1955 Victoria Albert Museum These panels of silk cross stitch on exposed linen ground, with couched threads in a swirling design, were originally appliqued to a velvet ground. The design of birds, animals and fish is based on the illustrations to Conrad Gesner's Icones Animalium, [] published in Zurich in 1560. The panels were embroidered by the imprisoned Mary Queen of Scots, assisted by Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury.

The Oxburgh Hangings, panel about 1570 Museum no. T.33II-1955 Victoria Albert Museum These panels of silk cross stitch on exposed linen ground, with couched threads in a swirling design, were originally appliqued to a velvet ground. The design of birds, animals and fish is based on the illustrations to Conrad Gesner's Icones Animalium, [] published in Zurich in 1560. The panels were embroidered by the imprisoned Mary Queen of Scots, assisted by Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury.

The Oxburgh Hangings: Embroidered panel of Jupiter, a dog belonging to Mary, Queen of Scots.  Ca. 1570-1585.

The Oxburgh Hangings

The Oxburgh Hangings: Embroidered panel of Jupiter, a dog belonging to Mary, Queen of Scots. Ca. 1570-1585.

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