Explore Peruvian Textiles, Ethnic Diversity, and more!

Flying or floating masked human figure holding a wand or a fan and a trophy head. Embroidered in strong colors.    This fragment is medium: wool technique: stem stitch on plain weave.    This fragment is from Peru and dated "300–100 BC".

PERU Flying or floating masked human figure holding a wand or a fan and a trophy head. Embroidered in strong colors. This fragment is medium: wool technique: stem stitch on plain weave. This fragment is from Peru and dated BC".

(Detail) Mantle, Wool plain weave with stem-stitch embroidery. Peru, Paracas, South Coast, Early Intermediate, 100-200A.D. Boston Museum of Fine Arts

(Detail) Mantle, Wool plain weave with stem-stitch embroidery. Peru, Paracas, South Coast, Early Intermediate, 100-200A.D. Boston Museum of Fine Arts

Paracas textile fragment, black plain weave ground covered in fine stem-stitch embroidery depicting two impersonator figures, both shown frontally b...

Paracas textile fragment, black plain weave ground covered in fine stem-stitch embroidery depicting two impersonator figures, both shown frontally b.

Embroidered Mantle Fragment. Peru, Paracas, 3rd-2nd century B.C.

Embroidered Mantle Fragment Date: century BCE Geography: Peru Culture: Paracas Medium: Camelid hair, cotton Accession Number:

Embroidery in strong colors covering entire surface. Winged figure holding trophy head.    This fragment is medium: wool technique: embroidery on plain weave foundation.    This fragment is from Peru and dated "300–100 BC".

Embroidery in strong colors covering entire surface. This fragment is medium: wool technique: embroidery on plain weave foundation. This fragment is from Peru and dated BC".

Textile used for a Tunic or Mantle, Peru; Chimú. Circa 1100–1450, made from cotton warp and camelid wool weft. Slit tapestry weave with dovetailing.

Monkey Mayhem Textile used for a Tunic or Mantle, Peru; Circa made from cotton warp and camelid wool weft. Slit tapestry weave with dovetailing

Chincheros Belt Weaving >< At Peru’s Chincheros market, a weaver displays a traditional Indian belt, still in progress. From shearing, spinning, and dying the wool, to weaving the brightly patterned cloths, Chincheros textiles are created entirely by hand.  Photo Credit: Andrea Pistolesi/Getty Images

Chincheros Belt Weaving >< At Peru’s Chincheros market, a weaver displays a traditional Indian belt, still in progress.

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