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Pleiades star cluster

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The Pleiades Star Cluster, Jan. The Pleiades is one of the brightest and closest open clusters. The Pleiades contains over 3000 stars, is about 400 light-years away, and only 13 light-years across.

The Pleiades star cluster (M45) is a group of 800 stars formed about 100 million years ago. The cluster is located 410 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Taurus.

Astrophotographer Chuck Manges of Hooversville, Pa, took this amazing photo of the Seven Sisters aka The Pleiades Star Cluster.

Messier 5 ~ A globular star cluster, 100,000 stars or more, bound by gravity and packed into a region around 165 light-years in diameter. It lies only 25,000 light-years away. Roaming the halo of our galaxy, globular star clusters are ancient members of the Milky Way. M5 is one of the oldest, its stars estimated to be nearly 13 billion years old. The beautiful star cluster is a popular target for Earthbound telescopes. (NASA)

Messier 5 ~ A globular star cluster, stars or more, bound by gravity…

Star Cluster Pismis 24/Nebula NGC 6357: Pismis 24 hangs over NGC 6357, a nebula about 8000 ly away in the constellation Scorpius. This picture showed that the brightest star in the cluster is in fact two stars in a tight binary orbit. Each star is about 100 times the Sun's mass. Hubble

Star Cluster Pismis NGC Pismis 24 hangs over NGC a nebula about 8000 ly away in Scorpius. This picture showed that the brightest star in the cluster is in fact two stars in a tight binary orbit. Each star is about 100 times the Sun's mass.

In the center of star-forming region 30 Doradus lies a huge cluster of the largest, hottest, most massive stars known. These stars, known collectively as star cluster R136, were captured above in visible light by the newly installed Wide Field Camera peering though the recently refurbished Hubble Space Telescope.

In the center of star-forming region 30 Doradus lies a huge cluster of the largest, hottest, most massive stars known. These stars, known collectively as star cluster were captured above in visible light by the Wide Field Camera peering through the r

The star Mira, with its 13-light-year-long tail, zips through the galaxy at 291,000 miles per hour! This image was made from several Galaxy Evolution Explorer images put together into a mosaic.

A real shooting star! Mira (MY-rah) is a star that scientists have studied for 400 years. But NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explvery surprising image of Mira. It showed for the first time that Mira has a long tail of dust and light-years long!

Super Star Cluster #Westerlund2! This cluster is so massive that it is expected to eventually evolve into a globular cluster.  It hosts a dozen O-class hypergiant stars, each one with a luminosity 30,000 - 1,000,000 times greater than that of our Sun.

infinity-imagined: Super Star Cluster Westerlund This cluster is so massive that it is expected to eventually evolve into a globular cluster. It hosts a dozen O-class hypergiant stars, each one with a luminosity - times greater than that of our Sun.

Pleiades Deep Field. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades lies about 400 light years away toward the constellation of the Bull (Taurus).

Also known as the Seven Sisters and the Pleiades lies about 400 light years away toward the constellation of the Bull (Taurus). Pleiades Deep Field Image Credit & Copyright: Stanislav Volskiy via apod.

#Hodge301 is a star cluster located in the #TarantulaNebula about 168,000 light years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud Galaxy. The Tarantula Nebula is a star forming region, fueled by the star clusters hidden inside. The stars of Hodge 301 formed tens of millions of years ago. The most massive quickly ran through their fuel and erupted into supernovae.

is a star cluster located in the about light years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud Galaxy. The Tarantula Nebula is a star forming region, fueled by the star clusters hidden inside. The stars of Hodge 301 formed tens of millions of years ago.

Star Cluster NGC 2367 lies about 7000 light-yrs from Earth in the constellation Canis Major. Having only existed for about 5 million years, most of its stars are young and hot and shine with an intense blue light. This contrasts wonderfully in this new image with the silky-red glow from the surrounding hydrogen gas. NGC 2367 and the nebula containing it are thought to be the nucleus of a larger nebula, known as Brand 16, which in turn is only a small part of a huge supershell, known as…

Star Cluster NGC 2367 lies about 7000 light-yrs from Earth in the constellation…

Star Cluster NGC 2074 in the Large Magellanic Cloud Hubble...  Isn't this just absolutely beautiful?....

Star Cluster NGC 2074 in the Large Magellanic Cloud Hubble.looks like our book cover

Hubble Space Telescope image of the R136 super star cluster, near the center of the 30 Doradus Nebula, also known as the Tarantula Nebula or NGC 2070.

Hubble Telescope image of the super star cluster, near the center of the 30 Doradus Nebula, aka the Tarantula Nebula or NGC

Great Attractor Star Cluster: ESO image of the region of the Great Attractor. (Something unseen is attracting the galaxies in the foreground. It might be dark matter or dark energy or perhaps something beyond our causality horizon.) On Flickr/Stuart Rankin

ESO image of the region of the Great Attractor. (Something unseen is attracting the galaxies in the foreground. It might be dark matter or dark energy or perhaps something beyond our causality horizon.

The star cluster Cygnus OB2 contains more than 60 O-type stars and about a thousand B-type stars. Deep observations with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have been used to detect the X-ray emission from the hot outer atmospheres, or coronas, of young stars.

A Nearby Stellar Cradle

A Nearby Stellar Cradle The Milky Way and other galaxies in the universe harbor many young star clusters and associations that each contain hundreds to thousands of hot, massive, young stars known as O and B stars

Superbubble located in a star cluster in the N44 nebula, inside the Large Magellanic Cloud. The image is a composite, with the blue, high-energy portion taken by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Additional data comes from the Spitzer space telescope, which observes cooler infrared wavelengths (outlined in red) and the European Southern Observatory’s Max-Planck-ESO telescope, which sees in ultraviolet (yellow).

10 Years of Mesmerizing Photos From NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope

A Surprisingly Bright Superbubble.This composite image shows a superbubble in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.

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