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Lt. General Stephen Dill Lee (Sep 22, 1833 – May 28, 1908) was promoted to lieutenant general on June 23, 1864, making Lee the youngest at this grade in the Confederate Army. Following the campaign's Battle of Nashville on December 15–16, Lee kept his troops closed up and well in hand despite the general rout of the rest of the Confederate forces. For 3 consecutive days, they would form the fighting rearguard of the otherwise disintegrated Army of Tennessee.

Lt. General Stephen Dill Lee (Sep 22, 1833 – May 28, 1908) was promoted to lieutenant general on June 23, 1864, making Lee the youngest at this grade in the Confederate Army. Following the campaign's Battle of Nashville on December 15–16, Lee kept his troops closed up and well in hand despite the general rout of the rest of the Confederate forces. For 3 consecutive days, they would form the fighting rearguard of the otherwise disintegrated Army of Tennessee.

Henry Thomas Harrison -The Spy that Changed the Course of Gettysburg  A a spy for Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet during Civil War.  Henry Thomas Harrison, a Confederate spy, supplied Generals Longstreet and Lee with details about the advancing Union army. Based solely on that information, Lee ordered his dispersed army to move immediately towards a small crossroads town in south-central Pennsylvania. Thus was the beginning of the historic three-day battle known as Gettysburg.

Henry Thomas Harrison -The Spy that Changed the Course of Gettysburg A a spy for Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet during Civil War. Henry Thomas Harrison, a Confederate spy, supplied Generals Longstreet and Lee with details about the advancing Union army. Based solely on that information, Lee ordered his dispersed army to move immediately towards a small crossroads town in south-central Pennsylvania. Thus was the beginning of the historic three-day battle known as Gettysburg.

Because most Confederate horses were privately owned, General Grant's order at Lee's surrender allowed the men to keep their horses and perhaps saved the breed. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Because most Confederate horses were privately owned, General Grant's order at Lee's surrender allowed the men to keep their horses and perhaps saved the breed. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Richard Lee Turberville Beale (May 22, 1819 – April 21, 1893)   Brigadier General Confederate States Army

Richard Lee Turberville Beale (May 22, 1819 – April 21, 1893) Brigadier General Confederate States Army

U. S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant, General and President

U. S. Grant

General William Dorsey Pender   Battle of Chancellorsville  A rising star among the Confederate army, the loss of Pender at Gettysburg would later be mourned by Lee, by whom he was considered one of his "best men."

General William Dorsey Pender Battle of Chancellorsville A rising star among the Confederate army, the loss of Pender at Gettysburg would later be mourned by Lee, by whom he was considered one of his "best men."

GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE (pictured here), nephew of Robert E. Lee and Governor of Virginia, said, "I was very fond of General Hancock. He was a noble, gallant fellow and a soldier of undoubted merit and great ability...He fought so well on his side during the war that when it was over he was satisfied, and sheathed his sword and believed that there must be fraternity between both sections to make the whole Republic prosperous."

GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE (pictured here), nephew of Robert E. Lee and Governor of Virginia, said, "I was very fond of General Hancock. He was a noble, gallant fellow and a soldier of undoubted merit and great ability...He fought so well on his side during the war that when it was over he was satisfied, and sheathed his sword and believed that there must be fraternity between both sections to make the whole Republic prosperous."

General George E. Pickett, namesake for the ill-fated ‘Pickett’s Charge’ during the Battle of Gettysburg

General George E. Pickett, namesake for the ill-fated ‘Pickett’s Charge’ during the Battle of Gettysburg

John Singleton Mosby (1833 – 1916) Confederate Cavalry  Commander whose raids against the Union Army in Northern Virginia earned him the badass moniker “The Gray Ghost.”  He was renowned for his bravery, daring attacks and lightning-fast tactics on horseback and led a partisan campaign against Northern forces in Northern and Central Virginia.  After the Civil War ended Mosby served as Consul to Hong Kong under the administration of President U.S Grant.

John Singleton Mosby (1833 – 1916) Confederate Cavalry Commander whose raids against the Union Army in Northern Virginia earned him the badass moniker “The Gray Ghost.” He was renowned for his bravery, daring attacks and lightning-fast tactics on horseback and led a partisan campaign against Northern forces in Northern and Central Virginia. After the Civil War ended Mosby served as Consul to Hong Kong under the administration of President U.S Grant.

The citizen-soldiers who fought for the Confederacy personified the best qualities of America. The preservation of liberty and freedom was the motivating factor in the South's decision to fight the Second American Revolution. The tenacity with which Confederate soldiers fought underscored their belief in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution. These attributes are the underpinning of our democratic society and represent the foundation on which this nation was built.

The citizen-soldiers who fought for the Confederacy personified the best qualities of America. The preservation of liberty and freedom was the motivating factor in the South's decision to fight the Second American Revolution. The tenacity with which Confederate soldiers fought underscored their belief in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution. These attributes are the underpinning of our democratic society and represent the foundation on which this nation was built.

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