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Germany occupied Denmark in 1940. When the Germans decided to deport Jews from Denmark in August 1943, Danes spontaneously organized a rescue operation and helped Jews reach the coast; fishermen then ferried them to neutral Sweden. The rescue operation expanded to include participation by the Danish resistance, the police, and the government. In little more than three weeks, the Danes ferried more than 7,000 Jews and close to 700 of their non-Jewish relatives to Sweden.

Germany occupied Denmark in 1940. When the Germans decided to deport Jews from Denmark in August 1943, Danes spontaneously organized a rescue operation and helped Jews reach the coast; fishermen then ferried them to neutral Sweden. The rescue operation expanded to include participation by the Danish resistance, the police, and the government. In little more than three weeks, the Danes ferried more than 7,000 Jews and close to 700 of their non-Jewish relatives to Sweden.

The Rescue of Danish Jews  -- Danish fisherman ferry Danish Jews across a narrow sound to neutral Sweden during German occupation of Denmark

The Rescue of Danish Jews -- Danish fisherman ferry Danish Jews across a narrow sound to neutral Sweden during German occupation of Denmark

A rare group photo of the Warsaw Ghetto Jewish police. The role of these auxiliary policemen was controversial, to say the least.They often treated their own blood with the brutality expected of the Germans.Their deployment next to German security inevitably characterized them as collaborators. Ironically, very few of them, if any, avoided the fate the Final Solution reserved for the Jews under German control -- which they thought they could escape by bearing the Jewish police armband.

A rare group photo of the Warsaw Ghetto Jewish police. The role of these auxiliary policemen was controversial, to say the least.They often treated their own blood with the brutality expected of the Germans.Their deployment next to German security inevitably characterized them as collaborators. Ironically, very few of them, if any, avoided the fate the Final Solution reserved for the Jews under German control -- which they thought they could escape by bearing the Jewish police armband.

Georg Ferdinand Duckwitz (September 29, 1904, Bremen – February 16, 1973) was a German attache who warned the Danish Jews about their intended deportation in 1943. It is estimated that he prevented the deportation of 95% of Denmark's Jews in the resulting rescue of the Danish Jews.

Georg Ferdinand Duckwitz (September 29, 1904, Bremen – February 16, 1973) was a German attache who warned the Danish Jews about their intended deportation in 1943. It is estimated that he prevented the deportation of 95% of Denmark's Jews in the resulting rescue of the Danish Jews.

Danes rescuing a fellow Jew

Danes rescuing a fellow Jew

Denmark -The heroic actions of Danish people during the autumn of 1943 saved nearly all of Denmark's Jews from concentration camps. Germans occupied the country in 1940, the Danish government resisted Nazi pressure to hand over its Jews. In 1943, the Danes intensified resistance, prompting a harsh Nazi reaction. the Germans began to arrest and deport Danish Jews. Danes alerted and hid the Jews, helping them to the coast and organizing secret passage across the sea to Sweden (pictured).

Denmark -The heroic actions of Danish people during the autumn of 1943 saved nearly all of Denmark's Jews from concentration camps. Germans occupied the country in 1940, the Danish government resisted Nazi pressure to hand over its Jews. In 1943, the Danes intensified resistance, prompting a harsh Nazi reaction. the Germans began to arrest and deport Danish Jews. Danes alerted and hid the Jews, helping them to the coast and organizing secret passage across the sea to Sweden (pictured).

Video about the Danish resistance movement made during WWII - Wikipedia

Video about the Danish resistance movement made during WWII - Wikipedia

Rabbi Marcus Melchior, Danish chief rabbi, who warned his congregants that the Germans intended to round up Denmarks Jews. Melchior himself went into hiding and escaped to Sweden. Copenhagen, Denmark, before 1943.

Rabbi Marcus Melchior, Danish chief rabbi, who warned his congregants that the Germans intended to round up Denmarks Jews. Melchior himself went into hiding and escaped to Sweden. Copenhagen, Denmark, before 1943.

The clandestine rescue of Danish Jews was undertaken at great personal risk. The boat pictured below and several others like it were used by one of the earliest rescue operations organized by a group of Danes code-named the “Helsingor Sewing Club.” The escape route they provided, named the “Kiaer Line” after Erling Kiaer, founder of the “Helsingor Sewing Club,” enabled several hundred Jews to escape across a narrow strait to the Swedish coast. On each trip, the boat carried 12-14 Jewish…

The clandestine rescue of Danish Jews was undertaken at great personal risk. The boat pictured below and several others like it were used by one of the earliest rescue operations organized by a group of Danes code-named the “Helsingor Sewing Club.” The escape route they provided, named the “Kiaer Line” after Erling Kiaer, founder of the “Helsingor Sewing Club,” enabled several hundred Jews to escape across a narrow strait to the Swedish coast. On each trip, the boat carried 12-14 Jewish…

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