Winter Landscape with Ice Skaters, Hendrick Avercamp, c. 1608  oil on panel, h 77.3cm × w 131.9cm  The oil paint is effective due to the color detail.  With all of the white for winter, the other colors needed to pop.   If water color had been used, it may have appeared dull.

Hendrick Avercamp, Winterlandschap met schaatsers, ca.

Woman Reading a Letter, Johannes Vermeer, c. 1663  oil on canvas, h 46.5cm × w 39cm × d 6.5cm  I just love this painting. I can really feel the mood.  I imagine she is with child and the letter is from her husband who is away at war.  I think the lighting is very effective and could not have been captured the same way with other media such as chalk.

Johannes Vermeer Woman in Blue Reading a Letter, , Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Read more about the symbolism and interpretation of Woman in Blue Reading a Letter by Johannes Vermeer.

Woman with a Child in a Pantry, Pieter de Hooch, c. 1656 - c. 1660  oil on canvas, h 65cm × w 60.5cm.  The color on the floor is a very important part of this painting.  It brings the floor to life.   I believe without the color the image would not stand out as much.  If this was a charcoal painting, the room would not come to life.

woman with a child in a pantry pieter de hooch 1658 rijksmuseum amsterdam

A Pelican and other Birds near a Pool, Known as ‘The Floating Feather’, Melchior d' Hondecoeter, c. 1680  oil on canvas, h 159cm × w 144cm  The oil paint used on this piece of art allows all of natures colors to come to life.  This oil painting would not have been effective if it was done in ink.

Het drijvend veertje’, Melchior d' Hondecoeter, ca.

A Writer Trimming his Pen, Jan Ekels (II), 1784  oil on panel, h 27.5cm × w 23.5cm.  The mirror in this paining seems to actually work or be real.  If I saw this paining in person, I would be tempted to look in the mirror at myself.  If the artist had used charcoal that would not be possible.

A Writer Trimming his Pen, Jan Ekels (II), 1784 - Rijksmuseum

Old Woman Reading, Gerard Dou, c. 1631 - c. 1632 oil on panel, h 71.2cm × w 55.2cm × d 1.1cm In this painting, there seems to be a light on allowing this woman to read the book. With out the gleam/shine of the oil paint, a light source may have had to be added to the painting.   If the artist had used sculpture, the light feature would not be possible without adding another sculpture.

Gerard Dou - Old Woman Reading a Lectionary (Portrait of Rembrandt’s Mother?

Calvary, Pseudo Jan Wellens de Cock, c. 1520 oil on panel, h 172.5cm × w 119cm  If you look closely, each person in this paining is wearing  different color clothes.  It make each person stand out.  The intensity of the oil colors makes that possible.  If the colors were not so intense, the people would have blended together making the crowd seem not as big and thus important.

Calvary, Pseudo Jan Wellens de Cock, c. 1520 oil on panel, h .

The Annunciation to the Virgin, Adriaen van de Velde, 1667 oil on canvas, h 128cm × w 176cm The intense colors on this oil paining seem to add to the illusion of an angel.  If this were to be done in charcoal, the color would not be present and the angel would not seem as real.

The Annunciation, Adriaen van de Velde, 1667

The Old Drinker, Gabriël Metsu, c. 1661 - c. 1663 oil on panel, h 22cm × w 19.5cm.   This is a very interesting piece of art work to me.  Its almost as if the painter dulled everything except the metal drinking cup.  It makes me think that is the only important thing to the old man.  I would not have had the same impression of the paining had the cup not been as lustrous as would have occurred if water paint had been used.

Gabriel Metsu - The Old Drinker - 1658 - Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Metsu's masterpiece moralistic on the perils of drunken debauchery, The Old Drinker

The Explosion of Gunboat nr 2, under Command of Jan van Speijk, off Antwerp, 5 February 1831, Martinus Schouman, 1832  oil on panel, h 53cm × w 76cm × d 6cm  The gleam/shine of the oil paint in this paining brings the explosion to life.  If the artist had used a duller paint, I think it would not feel as if you were actually there seeing the ship explode.

Explosion at Antwerp of Dutch Gunboat No. Commanded by Jan van Speyk, 5 February 1831

The Raampoortje in Amsterdam, Wouter Johannes van Troostwijk, 1809  oil on canvas, h 57cm × w 48cm.   The oil paint used in this painting allowed the ice formed in the pond to really gleam/shine making it appear real.  If the artist had used chalk it would have appeared dull.

Het Raampoortje in Amsterdam, Wouter Johannes van Troostwijk, 1809 - Rijksmuseum

'Mystieke paden': bosgezicht, Gust van de Wall Perné, 1907 oil on canvas, h 129cm × w 177cm This painting seems to be almost a blur or a figment of ones imagination.  The blending of the oil paint colors together allows that to happen.  This would not have been possible if the artist had tried to make a ceramic deer.  The illusion of the blur would have been lost.

Mystical Paths by Gustaaf van de Wall Perné

Landscape with Bathers, Joris van der Haagen, 1655 - 1669 oil on canvas, h 70cm × w 85.5cm The oil paint used in this painting makes the water appear lustrous and real.  If the artist would have used pencil, the effect would not have been the same.

Landscape with Bathers, Joris van der Haagen, 1655 - 1669 oil on canvas, h × w The oil paint used in this painting makes the water appear lustrous and real.

Naïef of karikaturaal portret van Jean-Etienne Liotard op ongeveer 54-jarige leeftijd, anonymous, c. 1752 - c. 1800  oil on panel, h 24cm × w 20cm The intense color of the coat and gleam of the bead make his man appear magical.  The oil paint allowed these features to stand out.  If another medium such as pencil would have been used, the man may have just appeared old.

jean etienne liotard/self portrait

River view near Deventer, Salomon van Ruysdael, 1645  oil on canvas, h 110cm × w 151.5cm  Once again, the gleam/shine on the lake is am important part if this painting.  It shows time of day and adds to the peacefulness.  This would not have occurred if the artist had used pencil.

River view near Deventer, Salomon van Ruysdael, 1645 - Rijksmuseum

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